Archive

Posts Tagged ‘html’

HTC/.htc files

January 12th, 2014 No comments

What is it? Internet Explorer 5-9 introduced behaviors. Behaviors are a way to add behaviors to XML (or HTML) elements with the use of CSS styles.

Why avoid it? The behavior attribute is only supported by Internet Explorer.

What to use instead? Use JavaScript and XML DOM (or HTML DOM) instead

MSIE 5-9 support a scripting (VBScript/JScript) technology called HTML Components (HTCs) to aid in DHTML behaviors. Support was dropped in MSIE 10, you will have to force the browser into MSIE 9 compatibility to use these.

Mozilla? it has a similar proprietary implementation.
http://dean.edwards.name/moz-behaviors/

Included CSS style:

<style type="text/css">
h1 { behavior: url(example.htc) }
</style>

Inline CSS style:

<p style="behavior:url(hilite.htc)">Hello World</p>

Apache MIME Type:

AddType text/x-component .htc

REFERENCES:

HTA/.hta files

January 11th, 2014 No comments

HTA/.hta files are a technology that Microsoft implemented in it’s browsers MSIE 5-9 to support rich web applications, MSIE 10 and newer do not implement it and must be forced into MSIE 9 compatibility mode.

Most often HTA was/is used to hide the browser controls (chrome) from the user to provide dialog windows.

EXAMPLE:

<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="x-ua-compatible" content="ie=9" />
<!-- does not work in 10 or above, so force it back down -->
<hta:application id="example"
applicationname="example"
border="1"
caption="no"
icon="icon.ico"
navigable="no"
scroll="no"
showintaskbar="no"
singleinstance="yes"
sysmenu="no"
windowstate="normal">
</hta:application>
</head>
</html>

Apache MIME Type:

AddType application/hta .hta

REFERENCES:

Hiding Firebug Lite controls in browser

January 5th, 2014 Comments off

I started getting extremely tired of the FireBug Lite overlaying content in some of my legacy websites. By taking a look at the markup it was adding, I found a quick and easy way to hide it for most users.

Adding the following to one of your CSS files should do the trick…


/* Begin hide FireBug Lite */
#jsConsole,
#jsConsoleShowSourceButton,
#jsConsoleHideSourceButton,
#jsConsoleShowConsoleButton,
#jsConsoleHideConsoleButton { display:none; }
/* End hide FireBug Lite */

NOTE: I have not yet confirmed, but this approach should work in other browsers such as MSIE, Chromium and Safari that also may use FireBug Lite.

HTML5 speech input

July 12th, 2013 No comments

Adding speech input to your webapp is much easier than it might first seem.
This is part of the proposed HTML5 enhancements to FORMS and is already implmented in some browsers.

Google Chrome (WebKit 534.24) added this in version 11 in April 2011.

XHTML compatible example:
<input type="text" x-webkit-speech="x-webkit-speech" speech="speech" value="" />

NOTE:
In this example, ‘x-webkit-speech’ is the proprietary attribute used by Google Chrome (WebKit). ‘speech’ is the expected HTML5 attribute when it is finalized.

REFERENCES:

CSS Cursors

December 9th, 2012 No comments

The use of CSS cursors within your browser based application or website is a great way to add feedback to the user to increase usability. This is increasingly important for AJAX applications that may be “busy” even when the user is not directly taking action within their browser.

These are all easily appended to classes in your CSS files:

  • default
  • auto
  • inherit
  • pointer
  • crosshair
  • text
  • help
  • move
  • progress
  • wait
  • e-resize
  • ne-resize
  • n-resize
  • nw-resize
  • w-resize
  • sw-resize
  • s-resize
  • se-resize

Partial (CSS3) support in current browsers:

  • none
  • all-scroll
  • context-menu
  • cell
  • vertical-text
  • alias
  • copy
  • no-drop
  • not-allowed
  • col-resize
  • row-resize
  • ew-resize
  • ns-resize
  • nesw-resize
  • nwse-resize

NOTE: for very old browser, you can also set several attributes to allow for the supported one to be used.

.example {
cursor:hand;/* IE5-IE5.5 only support (dropped in IE9) */
cursor:pointer; /* IE6 and later */
}

REFERENCES:

Google Web Fonts

November 28th, 2012 No comments

The use of non-traditional web fonts was once a very challenging task due to various browser specific implementations. Thankfully Google WebFonts have made this easy enough for most developers to add in a cross-browser manner in a matter of minutes.

WARNING, there are a few considerations to make here…

  1. Some browsers displays a blank space in place of the text that uses the font.
  2. … and then re-render text in the web font once it has loaded

Method 1: (most compatible, but cross-browser loading behavior varies)

<link href='http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Ubuntu:400,700' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />
<style type="text/css">
h1,p { font-family: 'Ubuntu', sans-serif; }
</style>

Method 2: (requires javascript, but is consistent cross-browser)

<script type="text/javascript">
WebFontConfig = {
google: { families: [ 'Ubuntu Mono','Ubuntu' ] }
};
(function() {
var wf = document.createElement('script');
wf.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https' : 'http') + '://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/webfont/1/webfont.js';
wf.type = 'text/javascript';
wf.async = 'true';
var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
s.parentNode.insertBefore(wf, s);
})();
</script>
<style type="text/css">
h1 { font-family: 'Ubuntu Mono','Courier New',monospace; }
p { font-family: 'Ubuntu','sans-serif'; }
</style>

MSIE iframe frameBorder=”0″ attribute is case sensitive?

November 25th, 2012 No comments

No, you are not going crazy… MSIE 6 and 7 are case sensitive for the ‘frameBorder‘ (and a few other attributes).
It seems that the JavaScript attribute names are expected to be used in the HTML, should you expect them to behave and look properly you’ll have to make some small changes to support, this is even more important when using JavaScript to update or change attributes.

<iframe... frameBorder="0"></iframe>

CSS media queries for landscape vs. portrait orientation

October 28th, 2012 No comments

As mobile devices become more prevalent in the web development domain, it is often advisable to provide appropriate CSS for each layout.

Here’s a starting point for browsers that support.


<style type="text/css">
@media all and (orientation:portrait) {
/* css adjustments for portrait go here */
}
@media all and (orientation:landscape) {
/* css adjustments for landscape go here */
}
</style>

window.location.reload(true);

October 18th, 2012 No comments

While working on legacy apps, you might occasionally find that a developer has written a function to reload the existing page. I’ve found that in many cases, the optional javascript argument is neglected in this case and thus the ‘cached’ copy of the page is presented, often showing stale or invalid data. The solution here is simple, always specify ‘true’ to force the page to be requested from the server.


<script type="text/javascript">
window.location.reload(true);//NOTE: 'true' forces NON-cached copy to be returned
</script>

REFERENCES:

No JavaScript support

October 11th, 2012 No comments

There are still a measurable number of internet users that browse without the use of JavaScript, use the NoScript plugin, or have disabled it for security purposes. In those cases, as well as for SEO. It’s often a good idea to manipulate the display to better accomodate these users. One of the most common methods is shown below, as we can toggle a CSS class on the HTML tag easily and use CSS “cascade” to hide or show alternate content.

NOTE: this example currently requires PrototypeJS, but can easily be changed to not do so.


<!DOCTYPE html>
<html class="no-js">
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
var ar = document.getElementsByTagName('html');
var i = ar.length;// should only be one!
while(i--){
Element.removeClassName(ar[i],'no-js');
}
</script>
<style type="text/css>
html .no-js-show { display:none; }
html.no-js .no-js-show { display:block; }
html.no-js .no-js-hide { display:none; }
</style>
</head>
<body>
JavaScript is:
<p class="no-js-hide">enabled</p>
<p class="no-js-show">JavaScript is disabled</p>
</body>
</html>